wikileaks - mirrors


Apparently Wikileaks cannot be shut down.  See also their facebook page here.

A rather interesting analysis by professor Henry Story is here.

Tags

  1. wikileaks
  2. 2010 events

Comments


Seth says
M 2010-12-05 13:39:26 14662
If the government can shut down pirate media copying it can shut down this. Just because there are lots of mirrors is no real problem. 
Oh really, no real problem to shut it down, huh ?  I don't thinks so.  This kind of thing is  what the internet was almost designed to sustain.  I will bet it will not be shut down.  It is just information, and once it is released, it can spread multiple independent nodes, and governments will not be able to get the Gennie back into the lamp.

Mark de LA says
Terrorism depends upon individuals to conduct evil on their own insanity & it hates the freedoms the USA enjoys & is still developing. This government may not be able to completely throttle the flow of either wikileaks or terrorists willing to commit suicide for their beliefs.  It can up the price by prosecution for disclosures & those who facilitate such disclosures as this.
In the end it is all good in this sense (see graphic below); in the short term it will cause some pain; in the short term it will cause some embarrassment; in the long term the government will go even farther underground in it's dealings & the cloak of opaqueness will begin to resemble the iron curtain. Transparency suffers. Openness will suffer! Maybe Assange will have to be willing to die for his beliefs. It could only be in the Internet age that a model shows up of what happens when espionage is broadcast world-wide rather than being exchanged in secret to specific entities for money or sex.  The openness of the Internet will also suffer.


Seth says
source: M above
... "government will go even farther underground in it's dealings & the cloak of opaqueness will begin to resemble the iron curtain. Transparency suffers. Openness will suffer"
I don't know that we can say that with any certainty at all.  Things could go in the opposite direction.  People can become more aware that their officials are hiding things from them and are overstepping the mandates given them by we the people.  We can then demand more transparency and openness.  The public business can be conducted in the open for all to see.  Those official who can't operate in that kind of environment will be weeded out.  I will shift what minuscule influence i have in that direction of change.  I had though that was the spirit behaind your We The People ... Want Transparency in our Government ... but then perhaps i misunderstood you.

Mark de LA says
seth 2010-12-06 10:41:05 14662
source: M above
... "government will go even farther underground in it's dealings & the cloak of opaqueness will begin to resemble the iron curtain. Transparency suffers. Openness will suffer"
I don't know that we can say that with any certainty at all.  Things could go in the opposite direction.  People can become more aware that their officials are hiding things from them and are overstepping the mandates given them by we the people.  We can then demand more transparency and openness.  The public business can be conducted in the open for all to see.  Those official who can't operate in that kind of environment will be weeded out.  I will shift what minuscule influence i have in that direction of change.  I had though that was the spirit behaind your We The People ... Want Transparency in our Government ... but then perhaps i misunderstood you.
Nothing in [my: item 14662] applauds ESPIONAGE & ANARCHY or LAWLESSNESS.  I still hold that the rule of law is the best course. The vote is our best weapon.  A truly free press & free Internet can go a long way towards democratic discussions. Like the Tao, it also includes both truths & lies - you have to sort 'em out. It is all good from a Taoist point of view. Embarrassed people & those culpable tend to clam-up (or lie) when exposed.



Mark de LA says
M 2010-12-06 11:26:17 14662
It is interesting that none of the leaks of information from wikileaks is of hacked secrets belonging to networks in Russia, North Korea, China or Iran.


Seth says
My comment to Henry Story's analysis ...
source: buzz public
Very interesting analysis indeed. Like you indicate, a speech act has a meaning only within a context, but when read outside of that context it can seem to have an entirely different meaning. So to release information and not include the context of it's original utterance can be viewed as repeating a lie. I'm thinking that might just be the tort of which Assange is guilty.
...

Seth says
Apparently this has become a kind of cyber-war ...
...


Mark de LA says
google operation payback is actually a crime while there may be some doubt about what the assange did being one.  DDoS & viruses are cyber-crimes.  Meanwhile, the Clueless Press Can't Decide If Espionage Is Journalism or not.
source: ... The why is easy. It seems many journalists are more worried about protecting their industry than national security. Limor claims “the question of whether WikiLeaks is journalism matters not a whit to the general public.” She followed that line with the journalistic equivalent of the Internet adage that “information wants to be free.” To Limor, “the world audience just wants information.”
Well, I guess that makes it all OK. Some traitor can give away U.S. secrets to the world or to a spy agency, but that’s fine because the world wants information. I imagine the world wants Limor’s bank account information too. Or those of the staff of The New York Times or other news outlets running with this story. Should that information be public? How about every personal e-mail journalists write? We saw what a little sunlight brought to the concept that reporters are neutral when the Journolist story broke.

... I only hope that, to make a point, journalists make every small detail of the assange's life surrounding Wikileaks, including his financial details, his sex life (probably boring), his backers & their lives available to the Internet for anyone to read (maybe before his own espionage trials begin).


Seth says
seth 2010-12-10 09:41:16 14662
Looks like he is going to be charged by the USA for spying ...
source:some uk publication
He is likely to be prosecuted under the Espionage Act, which makes it a crime to receive national defence information if it is known to have been obtained illegally and could be used ‘to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation.’
works for me.

I said that also on the Wikileaks facebook commentary about this article here

Mark de LA says
BTW, don't hold your breath for journolists to do that while they are still celebrating the assange as a hero.


Mark de LA says
The net of it all is that the Golden Rule should work in both/all directions.


Seth says


Mark de LA says
Stratfor: ...

I have no idea whether or when he got involved in the acquisition of the material. I do know — given the material leaked so far — that there is little beyond minor embarrassments contained within it. Therefore, Assange’s claim that geopolitics has changed is as false as it is bold. Whether he committed any crime, including rape, is something I have no idea about. What he is clearly guilty of is hyperbole. But contrary to what he intended, he did do a service to the United States. New controls will be placed on the kind of low-grade material he published. Secretary of Defense Gates made the following point on this:

“Now, I’ve heard the impact of these releases on our foreign policy described as a meltdown, as a game-changer, and so on. I think those descriptions are fairly significantly overwrought. The fact is, governments deal with the United States because it’s in their interest, not because they like us, not because they trust us, and not because they believe we can keep secrets. Many governments — some governments — deal with us because they fear us, some because they respect us, most because they need us. We are still essentially, as has been said before, the indispensable nation.

“Is this embarrassing? Yes. Is it awkward? Yes. Consequences for U.S. foreign policy? I think fairly modest.”



Read more: Taking Stock of WikiLeaks | STRATFOR
... Read this fairly decent analysis of Wikileaks by a purveyor of overpriced geopolitical intelligence.



Mark de LA says
Apparently the assanger doesn't like being leaked on ... WikiLeaks boss Julian Assange turns on everyone & The wildly promiscuous lifestyle of WikiLeaks boss Julian Assange: Look away now Jemima as our report reveals the sordid truth .
~

Seth says
You can throw Dave Winer's comments into the mix.  Sexism and feminism and free speech all mixed up in the soup ... no wonder it is so tasty.

Seth says
Wikileaks has a cool logo ... great branding going on here.  Me, i'd consider getting a collectible, but all they have is t-shirts.  In 5 years time, you should be able to resell it on ebay for a tidy profit.

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